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Southern Gardening

March 18, 1999 - Filed Under: Vegetable Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Growing fresh produce for the picking doesn't always mean having an intensive garden, a square-foot garden or an acre or more. It can be as simple and fun as growing a basket of petunias, and baskets are where I would like to start.

March 11, 1999 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

The environment where I grew up made azaleas out of the question, so the site of all our azaleas erupting into spectacular blooms astounds me.

I'm further amazed that the native azaleas haven't caught on around here. Perhaps it's because growers haven't perfected the mass production of these azaleas or that demand is so great for the other azaleas. Maybe it is simply not worth the time, expense and effort to grow these on a grand scale.

March 4, 1999 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

A trip to a favorite garden center can be similar to walking into an ice cream shop. The push of spring blooms, coupled with warmer weather may have you chomping at the bit to get out planting. But before you buy some of everything, stop and do a little thinking or planning.

February 25, 1999 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Ornamental grasses can really make a difference in our landscapes. The varieties abound for just the right look and location.

Dwarf sweet flag, mostly known as Japanese sweet flag, is one of the prettiest grasses we can use in the landscape. Although new in our local markets, this grass is drawing increased attention.

February 18, 1999 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Every week I try to tell you what's arriving in the world of plants, but this week's column is dedicated to what's old and still wonderful. Mississippi and much of the South provide some outstanding old homesteads with long-standing plants announcing spring's arrival.

February 11, 1999 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

To promote 1999 as the year of the salvia, the National Garden Bureau sent me pages and pages of information, but failed to mention my favorites. In defense of the National Garden Bureau, Mother Nature provided us with more than 900 species of salvia.

February 4, 1999 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Competition is not only great for the airline industry, but for plant breeders and adventuresome gardeners as well.

January 28, 1999 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Two new hollies, Liberty and Patriot, have made their debut to the Red Holly Hybrid group, giving gardeners seven beautiful new hollies from which to choose.

This group is called the Red Holly Hybrids because several produce new growth that is a red to maroon color. As a whole, these are some of the most elegant and statuesque hollies and are rapidly gaining recognition from Texas to the East Coast. In Mississippi, they are produced in Poplarville and Lucedale.

January 21, 1999 - Filed Under: Vegetable Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

As a kid, I longed for 1986 when Haley's Comet would streak across the sky. Others quaked in fear of that ominous comet that comes around every 70-something years. Now, many of the same omens are forecast for the year 2000.

January 14, 1999 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Growers will not be disappointed by the trends toward bold flowering beds and orange colors in 1999.

The recent Grower Expo in Atlanta provide me the opportunity to hear several well-known writers and horticulturists as they describe the trends for the coming season.

January 7, 1999 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

A recent trip to exchange Christmas gifts actually perked my spirits a little when I found a new shipment of roses ready for winter planting on the shelves. The aspect of new plants, changes in the garden, and blooms in the springtime have many of us talking about gardening even on these coldest days of winter.

December 31, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

The New Year looks very promising from the standpoint of new plants for the gardener. The All-America Selections committee has recognized 12 winners for 1999. These winners also represent several countries like Germany, Japan, Taiwan and China.

December 24, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

As I attempted to button my favorite pair of pants, it became quite evident there was a problem. They had obviously shrunk from high humidity in my closet. It looks like the same New Year's resolution will be at the top of my list again, but only after gorging during the bowl games.

There are several New Year's gardening resolutions we all need to make to have a better and more environmentally friendly garden next year.

December 17, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Before beginning a program on landscaping with native plants, I asked some in the crowd what were some of their favorites. Plants like crape myrtles and camellias were high on their lists, as were several other plants from Japan and China.

Even though most of the plants they listed weren't natives, we as gardeners can create quite a landscape with home-style Southern plants. Mississippians can have an effective four-season landscape using native plants.

December 10, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

There are two things gardeners can't get enough of, besides plants: You can't have too many pruning shears or gardening books. A good book on gardening or plants may be the easiest and best gift for the gardener on your list.

My favorite book on perennials is Perennial Garden Color by Dr. William C. Welch. It is available from Taylor Publishing. This is one the most informative, beautiful and interesting books on perennials.

December 3, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

This is the time of the year when many landscapes look rather barren and ineffective without evergreens. Even before a hard freeze, the dormant grass and defoliated trees bring a different look to the landscape.

Evergreens, which should serve as our backdrop for annuals and perennials the rest of the year, are important in a good winter landscape. Evergreens include more than just conifers.

November 25, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter,
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

The big push for the ideal Christmas gift has begun and for gardeners the wish list can be quite extensive. It's not a tie, flannel pajamas or fuzzy slippers but something for the horticultural spirit.

For those who are tired of trying to protect plants in the winter, a hobby greenhouse is an easy and timely solution. Greenhouse gardening will soon become a passion instead of a hobby.

November 19, 1998 - Filed Under: Trees

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Despite droughty, warm conditions this October, fall leaf colors have been very good. This brings up the question of what makes fall color good.

Start with a good species. The trees that have been most spectacular in my neighborhood are the hickories. Hickories, have bold, yellow leaves that hold for a long time.

November 12, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Many gardeners, myself included, grab hold of the idea that bigger is always better, not only from the size of our flowerbeds, but to the actual size of the flowers. Sometimes, however, a large number of smaller flowers make a bigger show than a few large blooms.

One flower that gets overlooked because of its diminutive size is the Viola, or Johnny Jump-up. Find these at garden centers now ready for planting just down the aisle from pansies.

November 5, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Azalea lovers should rejoice over some new varieties that have made their way to our state. Many gardeners don't realize that Mississippi has some of the most progressive and innovative tree, shrub and bedding plant producers from the Gulf Coast to the far north.

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