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The base of trees is covered by a fire ant mound.
May 1, 2024

Sunshine and long days make summertime in the South desirable for people, but those same conditions are exactly what allows the dreaded, imported fire ants to thrive.

Almost any sunny, grassy area left unattended will soon be home to fire ants. Fire ants were accidentally imported from South America to Mobile in the 1930s and have since spread throughout the Southeast.

A small brown insect has long, white wings.
April 12, 2024

Invasive Formosan subterranean termites were first found in the state 40 years ago, and soon, these dangerous pests will swarm and threaten unprotected structures in about one-third of Mississippi’s counties.
Santos Portugal, Mississippi State University Extension Service urban entomologist, said Formosan termites typically swarm in the millions from early May to early June. They have the ability to infest and significantly damage structures much more quickly than native subterranean termites.

A black, winged insect has red eyes and markings.
March 25, 2024

The South’s natural background music of the summer will start as soon as cicadas, known for their loud songs, emerge across parts of the state.
Blake Layton, entomologist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said Mississippi is home to at least 24 types of cicadas. These are classified as either annual or periodical cicadas.

Success Stories

Steven Bell stands beside a truck housing a mosquito sprayer.
Volume 5 Number 3

When most people think of mosquito control, they envision a large chemical tank in the bed of a pickup truck.

Spraying chemicals is actually the last resort in integrated pest management (IPM), a scientific process of preventing invasive insects from reaching adulthood. IPM uses environmentally responsible alternatives, such as habitat removal, structural barriers, and larval control, before using sampling and resistance management to determine treatment plans for adult mosquitoes.

Nine men and women stand in front of a metal building.
Volume 5 Number 2

A dream of the Mississippi Pest Control Association and the Mississippi State University Extension Service is coming true after more than 20 years, thanks to a generous donation by one of Mississippi’s oldest pest-control companies.

A young boy wearing a Mississippi State t-shirt holds a butterfly-like insect out toward the camera.
Volume 5 Number 1

Bug Camp is not a place for kids who are afraid of bugs, warns Ryals Strider.

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Portrait of Dr. Blake Layton, Jr.
Extension Professor