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4-H Records Program

The Mississippi 4-H Record-Keeping Program has been in existence for several years. After the program lost national sponsorship, Mississippi 4-H recognized the importance of the record program and continued it with emphasis on building lifelong skills that will benefit young people throughout their lives.

One of the new features of the 4-H record program is that intermediate and senior aged 4-H'ers now have the option to type the complete record report form. Hard copies of each report form are still available through the county Extension office for those individuals choosing to do their record in their own handwriting.

Record-keeping is an important skill. The 4-H record-keeping process encourages members to develop skills in observation, gathering data, collecting and manipulating data, and general bookkeeping skills. All members are encouraged to keep a record book. The record book is a tool for members to help learn these skills. The 4-H record allows 4-H members the opportunity to set goals and keep records on the progress made toward reaching those goals. The record book also allows the 4-H member to record losses, profits, and other helpful information about their 4-H project work.

See Just for the Record: A 4-Her’s Guide to 4-H Records (P2544) for more information.

The Report Forms

The Mississippi 4-H Record-Keeping Program has two different report forms for 4-H members. The record has three age categories and uses two different report forms. The age categories are: Juniors age 8–9; Juniors age 10–11; Intermediates age 12–14; and Seniors age 15–18. Both junior age divisions complete the report form identified with the ages 8–11 in the heading. The intermediate and senior age division use the report form with ages 12–18 in the heading. The report forms are only one part of the total 4-H record book.

4-H Resume

Another phase of the record-keeping program is the 4-H resume. This opportunity is available only for senior 4-H members (15–18 years old). Members submitting resumes must have actively been enrolled in 4-H during the past 2 years. A 4-H member can submit a record book and a resume in the same year in the same project category or in two different project categories.

Awards

The awards for completing 4-H record books are very diverse. For both junior age categories, those records receiving blue ribbons receive cash awards along with 4-H ribbons.

Intermediate records are judged and placed in a blue, red, or white ribbon category. There are cash awards according to the record placing.

The senior age category records are judged the same as the intermediate records, with the exception of having trips awarded for those projects that carry trips to National 4-H Congress.

Other Records Submitted

  • Volunteer
  • 4-H Club
  • 4-H Volunteer Association
  • 4-H County Council

Record Book Categories

  • Achievement
  • Agriculture
  • Beef
  • Breads
  • Citizenship
  • Clothing/Textiles and Fashion Revue
  • Conservation of Natural Resources/Wildlife
  • Dairy (includes Dairy Goats0
  • Foods (includes Food and Nutrition, Food Conservation and Safety)
  • Forestry and Wood Science
  • Garden and Horticulture
  • Horse
  • Leadership
  • Photography
  • Sheep
  • Swine
  • Pet Care/Dog Care

Other Project Categories

  • Bicycle
  • Careers
  • Child Development
  • Computer
  • Consumer Education
  • Dairy Foods
  • Engineering
  • Fitness Leadership/Health
  • Home Environment
  • Home Management
  • Meat Goat
  • Personal Development
  • Plant and Soil Sciences
  • Poultry
  • Public Speaking
  • Recreation/Expressive Arts
  • Safety
  • Veterinary Science

Parts of the Member Record Book

Section I
Photo and Information Page

  • Include one wallet-sized school picture.
  • Include the following information:
    • Name, Address, City/State/Zip
    • Age and Date of Birth
    • Name of Main Project

Section II
The Content Page
Include the following:

  • Photo
  • Table of Contents
  • Mississippi Report Form
  • 4-H Story
  • Project Pictures

Section III
The Mississippi Report Form

  • If 4-H'er has completed record book more than 1 year, include all previous report forms.

Section IV
The 4-H Story
The story should include:

  • Introduction of member
  • Explanation of program
  • Highlights of other projects
  • Explanation of how 4-H helped you become a better citizen
  • Information about your future plans and career path

Section V
The Project Pictures

Photos from your project go in this section.

Other Helpful Information

  • Each of the report forms can be obtained from your local county Extension office.
  • One of the new features of the recordkeeping program is that reports for ages 12–18 can be typed (use Times New Roman font size 12).
  • Score sheet for member record include the following:
    • Project Work 50%
    • Leadership 25%
    • Citizenship 25%
  • Please refer to the 4-H Record Instruction Guide for information about putting your 4-H record together.
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